Introducing: Black Women and Religious Cultures Journal

The Black Women and Religious Cultures Journal publishes peer reviewed, interdisciplinary scholarship on Black women's intersectional realities in religions and spiritualities of local, national, and transnational contexts. BW&RC welcomes work by and about Black women of any generation and identity, from any geographic region of Africa and the African Diaspora.  https://www.blackwomenandreligiouscultures.com/submissions.  Contact us at: bwandrc@blackwomenandreligiouscultures.com.

“She Is in Bitter Distress”: A Womanist Ethic of Advocacy

For the past thirty years, many African American women as theologians, ethicists, and Bible scholars have consistently used a womanist interpretation, which we call our “hermeneutic” (a method for reading and studying the Bible or theology), to engage the intersection of race and ethnicity, gender, religion, and class. Such engagement is grounded in communal affirmation, … Continue reading “She Is in Bitter Distress”: A Womanist Ethic of Advocacy

Profile: Rev. Dr. Mitzi J. Smith

Rev. Dr. Mitzi J. Smith, Ph.D. is the J. Davison Philips Professor of New Testament, Columbia Theological Seminary, Decatur, GA. Prior to joining CTS, Smith taught for over thirteen years at Ashland Theological Seminary’s Detroit campus. Her latest book is Minoritized Women Reading Race and Ethnicity (co-edited with Jin Young Choi, 2020). You can learn … Continue reading Profile: Rev. Dr. Mitzi J. Smith

Mishpat as a Counter-Narrative to Nationalism

People of African descent embody a plethora of radical faith and activist traditions used to counter racial and ethnic disparities. This blog places the ethnic nationalism, espoused by the Kikuyu peasant farmers of the “Mau Mau Revolt” (1952-1960), into conversation with American nationalism today. While the revolt is known to play a pivotal role in … Continue reading Mishpat as a Counter-Narrative to Nationalism